Memory Care

Coordinating a Caregiving Team for Your Loved One Needing Memory Care

Coordinating a Caregiving Team for Your Loved One Needing Memory Care

“If you’ve assumed the role of primary caregiver for a loved one requiring memory care, it is very important that you begin organizing a caregiver support team as soon as possible,” says Susan Irrgang, Executive Director of Saunders House, located in Wynnewood, PA.

Memory care authorities explain that providing daily memory care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia can be extremely taxing on your physical, emotional and spiritual health – even to the point of causing exhaustion and ‘burnout.’

Memory Care Tips for Making Your Visits Meaningful

Your Memory Care Guide to Making Visits Meaningful with Someone with Alzheimer’s

Your Memory Care Guide to Making Visits Meaningful with Someone with Alzheimer’s

“When a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other form of memory impairment, family members and friends often don’t know what to do,” says Margie Hennessey, Admissions Director of the newly renovated Saunders House, located in Wynnewood, PA.

Tips for Holiday Storytelling and Reminiscing

Storytelling and Reminiscing with Family for the Holidays

Storytelling

The holidays can be a tough time for families who have a loved one with memory loss. When families gather, it’s hard not to start conversations with “Remember when…” and everyone chimes in on the memory. Relatives with memory loss might not be able to recall those times and can’t participate in the conversation, feeling left out, isolated and sad. However, there are still ways to reminisce about the past that includes the entire family. 

Caregiver Tips for Choosing the Right Respite Care Service

Tips for Understanding the Effects of Alzheimer's on the Family

The Effects of Alzheimer’s on the Family: Why it’s Important to Understand and Prepare

The effects of Alzheimer's disease on families

Sam Streater, Director of Activities at Saunders House in Wynnewood, PA, says, “When a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, it has a ripple effect that can impact the entire family. In fact, gerontologists and psychologists often refer to the families of those with memory loss as the ‘invisible second patients.’

Tips for Managing the Challenging Behaviors of Loved Ones with Memory Loss

Managing the Challenging Behaviors of Loved Ones with Memory Loss

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, progressive memory disorders affect the way people feel and act in addition to disrupting their memory and other cognitive skills. Many caregivers find the changes in a loved one’s behavior caused by Alzheimer's to be the most challenging and distressing effect of the disease. 

The chief cause of the behavioral symptoms is the progressive deterioration of brain cells. However, medications, environmental influences and some medical conditions also can cause these symptoms or make them worse.

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